BRIT School short films shown with David Lean Cinema features

In partnership with the BRIT School’s Film & Media Production department, the David Lean Cinema is delighted to be screening a series of short films by the school’s students. A different film will be shown at selected screenings each month. All classifications are from Croydon Council.

The films are:

London.wav (U), directed by Samuel Marino. The sights and sounds of London are given a musical beat.

Cycliste De Reve (U), directed by Caleb Pithers-Gregory. This story of a boy’s efforts to gain a new bicycle recently won the School’s Best Year 12 Short Film award.

In the Middle of Nowhere (12A), directed by Lauryn Jackman. In this poetic film, a young woman searches for her identity.

Storybook Ending (U), directed by Harry Holland. A little girl must find all her childhood friends before bedtime.

Turnips (U), directed by Clint Frift. A Borough Market stall holder discusses how the market has changed over the years.

From Thought to Foot (U), directed by Molly Hart and George O’Regan. An idiosyncratic view of the world of shoe production.

For King and Country (PG), directed by George O’Regan. An impression of life in the trenches of the Great War.

Silver Screening (12A), directed by Idris Ellis. A young man experiments with (virtual) reality.

FILAM INDIA – Celebrating the diversity of Indian filmmaking

India has one of the world’s richest and most prolific film industries in the world.

To mark the 70th anniversary of Indian independence, Apsara Arts are delighted to present their ‘Filam India’ programme to celebrate some rarely seen true classics of Indian cinema.

Tickets £7 (Concessions £6) + 50p online booking fees.

Bookings can be made at Apsaraarts.ticketsource.co.uk (Ticket sales close a day before the screening). Tickets can also be purchased on the day at the Clocktower Box office in the Arts Bar, adjacent to the cinema. This opens 30 minutes before every film. Cash only. Tickets are NOT available via the David Lean Cinema boxoffice.

Enquiries: info@apsaraarts.co.uk
07751 622 907
www.apsaraarts.co.uk

Wed 11 October at 7pm

Gulabi Gang (12A)

2012, India, 96 minutes. Hindi with EST

Director: Nishtha Jain

A documentary about Sampat Pal Devi and the fiery women of her Gulabi (Pink) Gang, who empower themselves and take up the fight against gender violence, caste oppression and widespread corruption. They want to change the unchangeable with an organised social action and unification.

Fri 13 October at 7.30pm

Jalsaghar (The Music Room) (U)

1958, India, 95 mins. Bengali with EST

Director: Satyajit Ray

Stars: Chhabi Biswas, Padma Devi, Pinaki Sen Gupta, Gangapada Bose, Tulsi Lahari

Jalsaghar organically integrates song and dance into an arthouse film. The story centres on the decline of an aristocrat and patron of classical music who refuses to be trumped by his younger neighbour. The film features music composed by Ustad Vilayat Khan and sung by the legendary Begum Akhtar, with Roshan Kumari’s kathak dance.

Wed 25 October at 7.30pm

Court (PG)

2014, India, 116 mins. English, Gujarati, Hindi, Marathi with partial EST

Director: Chaitanya Tamhane

Stars: Vira Sathidar, Vivek Gomber, Geetanjali Kulkarni

Court is a quietly devastating, absurdist portrait of injustice, caste prejudice, and venal politics in contemporary India. Taking a pointed look at the contradictions of the Indian legal system, the story unfolds about Mumbai’s invisible underclass in which an aging folk singer emerges as an unlikely source of socio-political resistance. Court was met with universal critical acclaim on the film festival circuit and is one of the best films to emerge from the recent wave of independent Indian films.

Fri 27 October at 7.30pm

Hotel Salvation (Mukti Bhava) (12A)

2016, India, 99min. Hindi with EST

Director: Shubhashish Bhutiani

Stars: Adil Hussain, Lalit Behl, Geetanjali Kulkarni

Hotel Salvation is a warm tale of life and relationships, embedded in Indian culture and Hindu rituals. Faced with his father’s untimely & bizarre demand to go and die in the holy city of Varanasi and attain salvation, a son is left with no choice but to embark on this journey. The simple pleasures of this timeless city are explored as father and son belatedly come to know each other in the enforced intimacy of their cramped hotel room and the teaming streets. This gentle and tender multi award-winning film will make you laugh and cry.

Sat 4 November at 5.30pm

Pyaasa (U)

1957, India, 146 minutes. Hindi with EST

Director: Guru Dutt

Stars: Guru Dutt, Mala Sinha, Waheeda Rehman, Rehman

The film will be introduced by award winning filmmaker Ahmed Jamal

An immortal classic, Guru Dutt’s soulful, romantic masterpiece Pyaasa is frequently listed as one of the greatest films of all time. Translating as ‘The Thirsty One’, Pyaasa, set in post-independence Kolkata, the film tells the story of Vijay, a struggling poet trying to make his works known in post-independence India, and Gulabo, a prostitute with a heart of gold who eventually helps him get his poems published. Dutt’s stark black and white cinematography powerfully evokes the antagonistic forces at work in this classic romantic melodrama.

Wed 8 November at 7.30pm

Mahanagar (The Big City) (PG)

1964, India, 131 minutes. Bengali with EST

Director: Satyajit Ray

Stars: Madhabi Mukherjee, Anil Chatterjee, Haradhan Bannerjee, Jaya Bhaduri

Mahanagar documents with brilliant sensitivity a changing Calcutta of the mid-1950s. The screenplay delves into the agony and ecstasy, the turbulence and excitement of shifting social mores seen through a lower middle class Bengali family when a housewife gets a job as a saleswoman. It is a profound sociological study into men and women’s relationship, a portrayal of the world of work from the point of view of women, and an analysis of the clash of modernism and traditions in a middle-class urban family.

Fri 17 November at 7pm

Sholay (PG)

1975, India, 162 minutes. Hindi with EST

Director: Ramesh Sippy

Stars: Dharmendra, Sanjeev Kumar, Hema Malini, Amitabh Bachchan, Jaya Bhaduri, Amjad Khan

Dubbed The Godfather of Bollywood films, Sholay was ranked first in the “Top 10 Indian Films” of all time by the British Film Institute 2002 poll. The film drew heavily from the conventions of Westerns, and is a defining example of the masala film, which mixes several genres in one work. A retired police chief enlists the help of two criminals, to bring down a notorious bandit who murdered his family and terrorised the region. Opening with one of the most memorable action sequences in film history, it’s clear to see why this breathless action-adventure has left an impact on Indian cinema like no other.

Sat 25 November at 6pm

Kapoor & Sons (12A)

2016, India, 140 minutes. Hindi with EST

Director: Shakun Batra

Stars: Rishi Kapoor, Fawad Khan, Ratna Pathak, Sidharth Malhotra, Alia Bhatt

Two brothers visit their dysfunctional family and discover that their parent’s marriage is on the verge of collapse, the family is undergoing financial crunch, and much more, as the drama unfolds.

Coming Soon

Our November programme features the Globe Theatre’s performance of one of Shakespeare’s greatest works plus a choice selection of world cinema.

Those films marked with a * will also feature the BRIT short, In the Middle of Nowhere. Tickets on sale from Thursday 5th October:

Wed 1st, 2.30 & 7.30 – VICTORIA AND ABDUL (PG) – Stephen Frears directs the little-known story of the real-life relationship between Queen Victoria and her Indian servant Abdul Karim.

Thurs 2nd, 2.30 and 7.30 – BORG VS MCENROE (15) – Shia LaBeouf stars, charting the rivalry at the 1980 Wimbledon Championships.

Tues 7th, 7.30 – MOTHER! (18) – A couple’s relationship is tested when uninvited guests arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence.

Thurs 9th, 2.30 & 7.30 – LOVING VINCENT (15) * – The life of artist Vincent van Gogh is uniquely retold through the animation of oil paintings.

Tues 14th, 11.00 – Babes in Arms screeningTHE BIG SICK (15) – A Pakistani comedian must choose between culture and love while finding out who he really is.

Tues 14th, 7.30 – IN BETWEEN (15)* – Three Arab-Israeli women share an apartment in Tel Aviv, trying to balance their traditions with the modern world.

Thurs 16th, 11.00 (HOH) & 7.30 – GOODBYE CHRISTOPHER ROBIN (PG)* – Telling the real-life triumphs and tragedies of Winnie the Pooh author A.A. Milne.

Tues 21st, 7.30 – 7 DAYS (12A) * – This bittersweet drama explores the exquisite agonies of midlife romance on a stunningly beautiful Mediterranean island.

Thurs 23th, 2.00 & 7.00 – HENRY V (U) – Shakespeare charts the romance of the King, while he wages a campaign for land in France. (Tickets are £15 for all for this showing).

Tues 28th, 7.00 – BLADE RUNNER 2049 (15) – The much-anticipated sequel to the 1982 classic, a new Runner discovers a dark secret that could end humanity.

Thurs 30th, 2.30 & 7.30 – THE PARTY (15)* – Kristin Scott Thomas and Timothy Spall join an all-star cast as a celebration of a politician’s promotion gives an unexpected insight into the lives and loves of herself and her guests.

Sat 2nd Dec, 2.00 – THE TREE OF WOODEN CLOGS (12A) – An Italian classic showing both the ordinary and extraordinary of Lombard peasant life in the late 19th Century.

Our planned screenings for October are below. Tickets on sale from Thursday 7th September:

Tue 3 Oct, 7.30 – THE BIG SICK (15): A Pakistani comedian must choose between culture and love while finding out who he really is.

Wed 4 Oct, 2.30 (HOH) & 7.30 – DUNKIRK (12A): Christopher Nolan directs the story of the evacuation of Allied troops from the beaches of Dunkirk.

Thu 5 Oct at 2.30 & 7.30pm – DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST (12A): A poignant portrait of three generations of Gullah women, descendants from slaves, at the turn of the 20th century.

Tue 10 Oct, 11.00 – Babes in Arms screeningKEDI (U): Hundreds of thousands of Turkish cats roam the metropolis of Istanbul freely. This is the story of seven of them.

Tue 10 Oct, 7.30 – DETROIT (15): 50 years after the murder of three young black men, Kathryn Bigelow directs the story of civil unrest and chaos that led to their deaths.

Thu 12 Oct, 2.30 & 7.30 – FINAL PORTRAIT (15): Paris, 1964. Geoffrey Rush stars as artist Alberto Giacometti in an episode of fondness and frustration as he creates his last masterpiece.

Tue 17 Oct, 7.30 – LAND OF MINE (15): In post-World War II Denmark, young German POWs are forced to clear a beach of land mines as their Danish Sergeant learns to appreciate their plight.

Thu 19 Oct, 11 & 7.30 – THE ODYSSEY (PG): Following thirty years in the life of Captain Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the great French ocean-going adventurer.

Tues 24 Oct, 2.30 (HOH) & Thu 26 Oct, 7.30 – VICTORIA AND ABDUL (PG): Stephen Frears directs the little-known story of the real-life relationship between Queen Victoria and her Indian servant Abdul Karim.

Tue 24 Oct, 7.30 – GOD’S OWN COUNTRY (15): An unsentimental young Yorkshire sheep farmer is forced to consider his future after meeting a Romanian migrant worker.

Tue 31 Oct, 7.00 – Halloween Horror Show!A GHOST STORY (12A): After a passionate young couple are unexpectedly separated by a shocking loss, his ghost watches over her and their house’s future inhabitants.

Tue 31 Oct, 9.00 – Halloween Horror Show!IT COMES AT NIGHT (15): After an apocalypse leaves few survivors, two families are forced to share a home in an uneasy alliance to keep evil at bay.

Late August and September – DLC Programmer Philip Howard writes: We’ll return from our summer holiday with a trip back in time. And not just any trip – The Trip, Roger Corman’s long-banned psychedelic romp, starring Peter Fonda as an LSD first-timer. It’s one of two 1967 movies playing in association with the British Film Institute’s Summer Of Love – the other, Mike Nichols’ classic The Graduate, needs little introduction! Our opening week also features a British classic, 1956’s wartime aviation biopic Reach For The Sky, promoted by our friends at the Kenley Revival Project – and an extra screening of this summer’s hit, My Cousin Rachel.

The first brand new movie of the programme will be Baby Driver, the music-led heist adventure from Edgar Wright (Shaun Of The Dead). We then screen two fascinating and contrasting foreign language dramas about the lives of ordinary women: from France, The Midwife finds her orderly life shaken up when her late father’s mistress (Catherine Deneuve!) crashes onto the scene, while In This Corner Of The World is a beautiful and moving anime about a new bride in World War II Japan. We also have a contrasting pair of “grumpy old men” – Sweden’s Academy Award nominee A Man Called Ove could be your neighbour, unlike the title character of France’s The Death Of Louis XIV – a spellbinding performance by the great Jean-Pierre Léaud (The 400 Blows).

On September 5th, we present a fascinating one-off: the new silent movie London Symphony, with a Q&A with director Alex Barrett. Later in the month, we’ll see Istanbul too, in a charming documentary on its native Kedi (cats). We end September on another trip through time – to the American Civil War with Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst and Colin Farrell in Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled, and another perspective on the Second World War in Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk, which has already earned a third screening on October 4th.

Our planned screenings for late August and September are below. Tickets on sale from Thursday 20th July:

Tue 22nd Aug, 7.30 – THE TRIP (18): Roger Corman directs this 60’s psychedelic film. A TV director takes his first dose of LSD while facing a divorce.

Thue 24th Aug, 2.30 and 7.30 – THE GRADUATE (15): In this 1967 classic, Dustin Hoffman plays a young man, unsure of his life plans, who is seduced by an older woman.

Tue 29 Aug, 7.30 – BABY DRIVER (15): Edgar Wright directs the story of music-obsessed getaway driver Baby, who wants to ditch his shady lifestyle.

Thu 31 Aug, 2.30 and 7.30 – THE MIDWIFE (12A): Catherine Deneuve plays a tightly wound midwife forming an unlikely bond with her late father’s mistress.

Sat 2 Sep, 2.30 and Tue 12 Sep, 7.30: IN THIS CORNER OF THE WORLD (12A): Animated drama about a young bride, who must adapt to a new family and city as the tide of WWII turns against her native Japan.

Tue 5 Sep, 7.30 – LONDON SYMPHONY (PG): A poetic journey through the city of London, with a celebration of its culture and diversity.

Thu 7 Sep, 11 and 7.30 – A MAN CALLED OVE (15): In this Best Foreign Language Oscar nominee, after giving up on life, an ill-tempered retiree discovers friendship with his boisterous new neighbours.

Tues 12th Sept, 11.00 – Babes in Arms screeningMY COUSIN RACHEL (12A): A new version of Daphne du Maurier’s classic tale starring Rachel Weisz and Sam Claflin.

Thu 14 Sep, 2.30 and 7.30 – THE BEGUILED (15): Sofia Coppola directs this 1971 classic remake. Passions rise as a soldier wounded in the US Civil War, finds refuge in a school for young ladies.

Tue 19th Sep, 7.30 – KEDI (U): Hundreds of thousands of Turkish cats roam the metropolis of Istanbul freely. This is the story of seven of them.

Wed 20 Sep, 2.30 (HOH) and 7.30 – DUNKIRK (12A): Christopher Nolan directs the story of the evacuation of Allied troops from the beaches of Dunkirk.

Tue 26 Sep, 7.30 – THE DEATH OF LOUIS XIV (12A): Written and directed by Albert Serra, this historical drama takes its audience to the royal deathbed.

July and early August – DLC Programmer Philip Howard writes: Our programme for July and the first part of August is now on sale, and it’s especially diverse, with movies dating from almost a century of cinema, filmed by some great directors and produced in ten countries.

Our two revivals are from 1921 and 1956. Der Müde Tod, also known as Destiny, is an early masterpiece from Fritz Lang, who went on to direct Metropolis and M. This intriguing tale of a young woman taking on Death himself was an influence on both Alfred Hitchcock and Ingmar Bergman. From much closer to home, Reach For The Sky is a biopic of Douglas Bader, whose Battle of Britain heroics were recreated at RAF Kenley.

From the present day, yet almost as wordless as Der Müde Tod, The Red Turtle is one of two Academy Award Best Animated Feature nominees. A co-production with Japan’s legendary Studio Ghibli, it’s the beautiful and mysterious story of a man shipwrecked on a lush but seemingly deserted tropical island… Our other animation is My Life As A Courgette, the powerful, hopeful stop-motion tale of a young boy finding a new life and community in a foster home. And speaking of new families, in the engaging Gifted, American seven-year-old Mary is a prodigy whose uncle and grandmother (a globetrotting Lindsay Duncan) can’t agree whether she should have a normal childhood or fulfil her great academic potential.

Shot in exquisite black and white, and set in Germany shortly after the First World War, Frantz is a stunning new release from Potiche and 8 Women director François Ozon. Another monochrome gem is a delightful little movie set in 1960s Finland: The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki. Why is Olli so happy? He’s fallen in love – although he’s supposed to be fighting for a world boxing crown! Concluding our tour of three continents, Hirokazu Koreeda – the director of last year’s sublime Our Little Sister – is welcomed back with another involving family saga, After The Storm.

Headlining the three new British films on our programme, My Cousin Rachel is a remake of the 1952 classic, with Rachel Weisz and Sam Claflin in the roles originally taken by Olivia de Havilland and Richard Burton. It’s joined by impressive rural drama The Levelling and, with Roger Allam on rambunctious form, an adaptation of Stephen Fry’s comic novel The Hippopotamus.

So, with four films under 90 minutes and only one over two hours, we hope you’ll take plenty of short breaks from the English summer to join us at the David Lean.

Our planned screenings for July and early August are below. Tickets on sale from Thursday 8th June:
Sat 1st, 2.30 & Tue 4th, 7.30 – THE RED TURTLE (PG): In this animation, a shipwrecked man has a life-changing encounter with a giant turtle.

Thu 6th, 2.30 & 7.30 – FRANTZ (12A): In François Ozon’s film set in post-WWI Europe, a young German meets a mysterious Frenchman at her fiancé’s grave.

Tue 11th, 11 – Babes in Arms screeningTHEIR FINEST (12A)

Tue 11th, 7.30 – THE LEVELLING (15): A young vet returns to the family farm after her brother’s sudden death, in this debut film from Hope Dickson Leach.

Thu 13th, 11 & 7.30 – THE HAPPIEST DAY IN THE LIFE OF OLLI MÄKI (12A): A Finnish boxer falls in love just before a world title fight: a true(ish) story!

Tue 18th, 7.30 – DESTINY (DER MÜDE TOD) (PG): In Fritz Lang’s restored silent classic, Death gives a young woman three chances to save her fiancé from his fate.

Thu 20th, 2.30 (HOH) & 7.30 – MY COUSIN RACHEL (12A): A new version of Daphne du Maurier’s classic tale starring Rachel Weisz and Sam Claflin.

Sat 22nd, 2.30 & Tue 1st, 7.30 – MY LIFE AS A COURGETTE (PG): A young orphan boy learns about trust and true love in this stop-motion animation.

Tue 25th, 7.30 – AFTER THE STORM (PG): A private detective struggles to reconnect with his ex-wife and young son in this drama from Hirokazu Koreeda (Our Little Sister).

Wed 26th, 2.30 & 7.30 – GIFTED (12A): A single man raising his child prodigy niece and her one-eyed pet cat is drawn into a custody battle with his mother.

Thu 3rd, 2.30 & 7.30 – THE HIPPOPOTAMUS (15): In this film of Stephen Fry’s novel, Roger Allam is a disgraced poet looking into some unexplained miracles.

Sat 19th, 2.00 – REACH FOR THE SKY (U): This classic film, telling the story of WWII pilot Douglas Bader (Kenneth More), was filmed at Kenley aerodrome. All tickets £5.

June – DLC Programmer Philip Howard writes: The late spring and early summer is a great time for British and world cinema releases. Many were produced in 2016 and held back until the American giants of the ‘awards season’ had departed – indeed, six of the eight new releases in our June programme featured in October’s London Film Festival.

This allows us to bring you no fewer than six British titles. As promised earlier in April, we’re pleased to announce the two big new releases – the Julian Barnes adaptation The Sense of an Ending and wartime comedy-drama Their Finest. We were among the LFF audiences who roared with laughter at the deliciously absurd Mindhorn, starring Julian Barrett (The Mighty Boosh) as a TV detective called on to solve a real case, and held their breath at Florence Pugh’s astonishing performance as the bold, desperate antiheroine Lady Macbeth. Those of you who enjoy our occasional archive screenings will be in clover at the end of the month – we have two! In association with the Croydon Heritage Festival, David Lean’s Brief Encounter will be discussed by a panel of film professionals. We travel to St John the Baptist Church for the Purley Festival, showing an early film by Terence Davies (A Quiet Passion): his memoir of 1950s Liverpool, The Long Day Closes.

Before our trip to Purley, we’ll visit Romania, Japan, Iraq and France. Graduation is the acclaimed tale of a morally upright doctor who betrays his principles to safeguard his daughter’s future, while Harmonium sees a family riven by discord when the father gives an old acquaintance a second chance. Narrated by Tilda Swinton, Letters From Baghdad explores the adventurous career of Gertrude Bell, who helped to shape the future of the Middle East after the First World War. Finally, and among my favourite films of the LFF, Heal the Living is a highly original, beautifully acted and wonderfully humane ensemble drama about the many lives changed over the course of a heart transplant case.

Our planned screenings for June are below. Tickets on sale from Thursday 4th May:
Thu 1st, 2.30 & 7.30 – GRADUATION (15): A Romanian doctor takes action when an attack on his daughter threatens her university scholarship chances.

Tue 6th, 7.30 – HARMONIUM (12A): In this Japanese drama, a man hires an old friend to help in his workshop, with disastrous results for his family life.

Thu 8th, 2.30 (HOH) & 7.30 – THE SENSE OF AN ENDING (15): Based on Julian Barnes’s Booker prize winning novel, Jim Broadbent plays a man forced to confront his past after receiving a diary.

Tue 13th, 11 – Babes in Arms screening – BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (PG) 2017

Tue 13th, 7.30 – LADY MACBETH (15): In 1865, a young woman trapped in a loveless marriage to an older man begins an affair with a man her own age.

Thu 15th, 11 & 7.30 – LETTERS FROM BAGHDAD (PG): Documentary that tells the story of Gertrude Bell, the explorer, diplomat and archaeologist who helped shape the map of the Middle East in the years after World War One.

Tue 20th, 7.30 – HEAL THE LIVING (12A): This French film follows the results of a young man’s accident and the donation of his heart to a sick woman.

Thu 22nd, 2.30 (HOH) & 7.30 – THEIR FINEST (12A): Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy star in a celebration of the British film industry in the Second World War.

Sat 24th, 2.30 – DAVID LEAN PANEL DISCUSSION + BRIEF ENCOUNTER (PG): Croydon Heritage Festival screening. Lean’s 1945 classic will be followed by a discussion of his work by a panel of film professionals.

Tue 27th, 7.30 – MINDHORN (15): Julian Barratt (The Mighty Boosh) plays a has-been actor helping the police to capture a serial killer who will only talk to Mindhorn, a fictional character he used to play in a successful TV series.

Thu 29th, 8.00 – THE LONG DAY CLOSES (PG): Purley Festival screening, at St. John the Baptist church hall, Purley, of Terence Davies’s adolescent memoir.

May – DLC Programmer Philip Howard writes: After the great popularity of the mostly American films in our ‘awards season’ programmes, May begins the annual transition towards the many foreign language, British and independent films in our summer programmes. We start in ‘awards’ mode with a huge American crossover hit – the ingenious horror-satire Get Out – and the Best Foreign Language Academy Award winner, Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman, as well as welcome repeats of the popular Viceroy’s House, while our Babes in Arms title will be Best Picture winner Moonlight.

Our second and third weeks are much more typical of the months ahead, with a trio of fascinating, contrasting movies from around the world – from Korea, the dazzling adaptation of Sarah Waters’ Fingersmith, The Handmaiden; from Spain, though written by I, Daniel Blake’s Paul Laverty, the socially conscious road trip drama The Olive Tree; from Japan, the superbly animated and emotionally involving A Silent Voice. Our remaining five titles all feature major British talent, the first of whom is director Terence Davies, who has moved from his early films’ native Liverpool to Sunset Song’s Scotland and now to New England for his long-awaited Emily Dickinson biopic A Quiet Passion.

As promised at our last AGM, we have explored filmed theatre options, and now bring you the Globe’s Twelfth Night, starring Mark Rylance and Stephen Fry. Adventure epic The Lost City of Z stars Charlie Hunnam, Robert Pattinson and Sienna Miller, while Emma Watson lights up the live action remake of Beauty and the Beast. Finally, set in Boston yet filmed in Brighton, is Ben Wheatley’s scintillating shoot-out Free Fire. I hope you’ll enjoy many of these films at the David Lean… and, with more excellent movies in the pipeline, we’ll preview a couple of our June highlights next week!

Our planned screenings for May are below. Tickets on sale from Thursday 6th April:

Tue 2nd, 7.30 – GET OUT (15): In this acclaimed comedy horror film, things go badly for a young black man when he visits his white girlfriend’s parents.

Wed 3rd, 2.30 (HOH) & 7.30 – VICEROY’S HOUSE (12A)Extra screenings

Thu 4th, 2.30 & 7.30 – THE SALESMAN (12A): Iranian drama from Asghar Farhadi (A Separation), winner of this year’s Best Foreign Language Oscar.

Tue 9th, 11 – Babes in Arms screeningMOONLIGHT (15)

Tue 9th, 7.30 & Thu 11th, 2.30 – THE OLIVE TREE (15): Written by her partner Paul Laverty (I, Daniel Blake), Icíar Bollaín’s film follows Alma on her quest from Spain to Germany to track down the olive tree once owned by her grandfather.

Thu 11th, 7.30 – THE HANDMAIDEN (18): Psychological thriller from Park Chan-wook (Oldboy), which moves the plot of Sarah Waters’s Fingersmith to Japanese controlled Korea.

Sat 13th, 2.30 & Tue 16th, 7.30 – A SILENT VOICE (12A): In this emotionally rich Japanese anime, a boy seeks redemption after bullying his deaf classmate.

Thu 18th, 2.30 & 7.30 – A QUIET PASSION (12A): Film biography of Emily Dickinson directed by Terence Davies, starring Cynthia Nixon as the US poet.

Tue 23rd, 7.30 – THE LOST CITY OF Z (15): The story of explorer Col. Percival Fawcett, who disappeared looking for a lost city on the Amazon in the 1920s.

Thu 25th, 11 & 7 – TWELFTH NIGHT (U): Mark Rylance and Stephen Fry in the Globe Theatre production of the Bard’s comedy. Tickets £15 (no concessions).

Sat 27th, 2.30 & Tue 30th, 2.30 – BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (PG): Live-action version of the much-loved Disney cartoon, starring Emma Watson as Belle.

Tue 30th, 7.30 – FREE FIRE (15): In Ben Wheatley’s comedy crime thriller, an IRA gang go Stateside to buy guns from a dodgy fixer, but it soon goes wrong!!

April – DLC Programmer Philip Howard writes: Following our March programme, which has broken the David Lean’s pre-sales record, we’re delighted to bring you further Academy Awards contenders in April. (I’m writing this before the results are known!)

Joining our season opener Moonlight and rerun Lion among the Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay nominees are Fences and Hidden Figures, two contrasting tales of twentieth-century African-American life, also both nominated for acting awards (Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer and Denzil Washington). If you enjoy gently-paced character-based dramas such as last year’s Our Little Sister, then Best Original Screenplay nominee 20th Century Women will be an absolute treat. And, finally among the nominees, Elle is a rarity in being a foreign language film with a Best Actress nomination, for Isabelle Huppert.

Of course, Oscar’s decisions are often questioned. Elle (France) joins several excellent titles including Julieta (Spain) and Under the Shadow (UK) in not even making the nine-film Best Foreign Language longlist. The Academy also failed to recognise arguably American cinema’s breakthrough female performance of the year, Lily Gladstone’s charming and quietly heartbreaking turn as a lovestruck rancher in Certain Women – but I look forward to seeing her for a second time.

Elsewhere in the programme, fans of British cinema will be pleased to see Hugh Bonneville and Gillian Anderson in the Indian Partition drama Viceroy’s House, and there’s another opportunity to watch the popular Denial. Our many ballet lovers will be fascinated by Dancer, the biopic of former Royal Ballet star Sergei Polunin, while my niece and nephew report that Spanish adventure Zip & Zap and the Marble Gang is a treat for Saturday family audiences!

Our planned screenings for April are below. Tickets on sale from Thursday 9th March:

Tue 4th, 2.30 & 7.30 – MOONLIGHT (15): Award-winning story of a young, black man growing up amidst the drugs and crime of downtown Miami – tickets already on sale.

Extra screenings: Wed 5th, 2.30 – LION (PG); 7.30 – DENIAL (12A)

Thu 6th, 2.30 & 7.30 – 20TH CENTURY WOMEN (15): California, 1979. Annette Benning plays a single mother who enlists two younger friends (played by Greta Gerwig and Elle Fanning) to help with her teenage son’s upbringing.

Tue 11th, 11 – Babes in Arms screeningLION (PG)

Tue 11th, 7.30 – CERTAIN WOMEN (12A): Kelly Reichardt’s drama tells the story of three independent women in small-town Montana, starring Laura Dern, Michelle Williams, Kristen Stewart and newcomer Lily Gladstone.

Thu 13th, 2.30 & 7.30 – FENCES (12A): Denzil Washington directs himself and Oscar-tipped Viola Davis in August Wilson’s play about an African-American working-class family in the 1950s.

Sat 15th, 2.30 – ZIP & ZAP AND THE MARBLE GANG (U): In this Spanish children’s film, twin brothers Zip and Zap, with the help of other students, discover a secret hidden in the summer school they have been sent to.

Tue 18th, 7.30 – ELLE (18): Isabelle Huppert stars in Paul Verhoeven’s critically acclaimed revenge thriller, playing a successful businesswoman who is raped in her home.

Thu 20th, 11 & 7.30 – HIDDEN FIGURES (PG): The true story of the African-American women “human computers” who played a vital role in getting John Glenn into space while fighting gender, race and professional discrimination.

Tue 25th, 7.30 – DANCER (12A): Documentary about Sergei Polunin, the Ukrainian who became the Royal Ballet’s youngest ever principal dancer, before becoming disillusioned with fame and the ballet world.

Thu 27th, 2.30 (HOH) & 7.30 – VICEROY’S HOUSE (12A): Gurinder Chadha’s film tells the “upstairs downstairs” story of Lord and Lady Mountbatten (Hugh Bonneville and Gillian Anderson), as the empire prepares to hand India back to its people.

March – DLC Programmer Philip Howard writes: March is the peak ‘awards season’ month in the David Lean’s calendar, and the titles we’re putting on sale have 44 Academy Award nominations between them.

The film with the most nominations – a record-equalling 14 – is of course La La Land, for which additional screenings are now on sale. Another leading contender, Manchester by the Sea, also has an additional screening by popular demand. Two other Best Picture nominees will arrive at the DLC in March, each also boasting British acting nominees: Lion and Hacksaw Ridge. The fifth Best Picture nominee of the current programme – although actually our first April screening – is another of the favourites, Moonlight. Of the other four Best Picture nominees, Arrival and Hell or High Water have been highlights of the last few months, and we look forward to announcing April screenings of Fences and Hidden Figures in due course.

Our two other Oscar nominees are the Civil Rights-era romantic drama Loving, for which Ireland’s Ruth Negga is a Best Actress contender, and the uproarious father-daughter comedy Toni Erdmann is up for the Foreign Language title. The British Academy has excellent taste too – the wonderful Eagle Huntress has a Bafta nomination, and by popular demand we’re giving it a Saturday rerun. Another Bafta-nominated film is Denial, the story of the David Irving libel trial, with terrific performances from Rachel Weisz and Timothy Spall. A couple of other fine British features round off our varied programme: The BBC’s film critic Mark Kermode selected the Tehran-set supernatural thriller Under the Shadow as his best movie of 2016, and – as you may have noticed from this weekend’s media coverage – Danny Boyle, Ewan McGregor and friends are back in the long-awaited T2: Trainspotting.

Our planned screenings for March are below. Tickets on sale from Thursday 2nd February:

Extra screenings: Sat 4th, 2.30 & Tue 7th, 2.30 – LA LA LAND (12A); Wed 8th, 7.30 – MANCHESTER BY THE SEA (15); Sat 18th, 2.30 – THE EAGLE HUNTRESS (U)

Tue 7th, 7.30pm – UNDER THE SHADOW (15): In war-torn 1980s Tehran, a mother and daughter are trapped in their home, which is haunted by a mysterious evil.

Thu 9th, 2.30 & 7.30 – JACKIE (15): Oscar-tipped Natalie Portman stars in this drama about how JFK’s widow dealt with the aftermath of his assassination.

Tue 14th, 11 – Babes in Arms screening – LA LA LAND (12A)

Tue 14th, 7.30 – HACKSAW RIDGE (15): Mel Gibson’s film about Army Medic Desmond T. Doss (Andrew Garfield), the pacifist who was decorated in WWII, but who never fired a shot.

Thu 16th, 11 & 7.30 – DENIAL (12A): David Hare scripts this story of how Holocaust denier David Irving (Timothy Spall) sued fellow historian Deborah E. Lipstadt (Rachel Weisz) for libel.

Tue 21st, 7.30 – T2: TRAINSPOTTING (18): Danny Boyle and the cast of the original return to Edinburgh to continue the adventures of Renton and co.

Thu 23rd, 2.30 (HOH) & 7.30 – LOVING (12A): The moving story of interracial couple Richard and Mildred Loving, who challenged the anti-miscegenation laws in Virginia in the 1960s.

Tue 28th, 7 – TONI ERDMANN (15): A critically acclaimed German black comedy about a practical joker father’s strained relationship with his daughter.

Thu 30th, 2.30 & 7.30 – LION (PG): A young Indian boy becomes lost in a strange city. Years later, adopted in Australia, he tries to rediscover his childhood home. Dev Patel and Nicole Kidman star in this fascinating drama.

Tue 4th April, 2.30 & 7.30 – MOONLIGHT (15): Award-winning story of a young, black man growing up amidst the drugs and crime of downtown Miami.

Latest news

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News Update 31 July 2016

Award-winning short A Moment to Move screening with Heart of a Dog
We are delighted to be able to show A Moment to Move as part of our Heart of a Dog screenings on Thursday August 4th. This beautifully filmed, witty and honest 20 minute short, directed by Georgia Parris, and starring Diana Kent and Phoebe Fox, won the XX Award at the 2014 Underwire Festival (“the UK’s only film festival celebrating female filmmaking talent”).
Martha is an older woman, and she’s feeling it, but she’s not ready to adhere to a stereotype just yet. Problem is, she comes to that realisation on the day of her daughter’s wedding.
Watch a teaser here.

Director Q&A at 7.30pm The Last Man on the Moon screening
We’re delighted to announce that Mark Craig – who wrote and directed this highly-acclaimed British documentary – will introduce the 7.30pm screening on Thursday 11 August, and will take part in a Q&A afterwards. It promises to be a fascinating evening for anyone intrigued by space exploration and the Apollo missions, and it’s an exceptional opportunity to inspire children interested in science.

News Update 24 July 2016 – Click to follow link

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News Update 31 May 2016

Son of Saul
Son of Saul

Dear Supporter,

2016 has been a year of consistently good attendances, but there will always be exceptions and last week was certainly one of them! Shooting Stars reinforced that we can struggle to attract large audiences to vintage screenings, and the response, although far from negative, didn’t quite match the film’s reputation. I Am Belfast also attracted modest numbers, but the feedback was very good and included enthusiastic praise from a supporter who grew up in Belfast.

Today’s (Tuesday) film is the extraordinary Son of Saul, recently described as “one of the greatest films ever made” (Sydney Morning Herald). Don’t forget there’s a rare Tuesday 2.30pm screening as well as one at 7.30pm, as we wanted to ensure that our daytime audience could see this outstanding winner of the 2016 Best Foreign Language Academy Award. Please note that the programme includes a 14-minute film With a Little Patience, also directed by László Nemes.

Thursday brings Victoria, an extraordinary German crime thriller. If you’ve read about it being shot in real time in a continuous, 138-minute camera shot, or the dialogue being mostly improvised from a 12-page script, the film’s reputation sounds almost too good to be true. But a scan of the glowing reviews confirms that praise such as “possibly the most emotionally pulsating film you’ll see all year” (Sky Movies), or “Combining stunning technical achievement with a thoroughly gripping story and terrific performances, this is a sensational thriller that demands to be seen” (WOW247), is highly-representative.

Tickets for both the above films should be available from our Clocktower box office.

A supporter recently made a point of saying how much she appreciates the excellent booking service provided by the “wonderful” staff at Wallace Arnold Worlchoice. It’s a pleasure to hear such appreciation, and supporters who haven’t visited their premises (at 62 George Street) may like to try booking there.

Once you’ve read the important news item below, please scroll down to see Philip Howard’s preview of our July films, and news of Croydon Comedy Festival, which we’re participating in. If you’re attending or considering seeing Death of a Gentleman on 7 June, please read the announcement directly below the preview, which may interest cycling enthusiasts as well as cricket fans. Note that this special event – a collaboration with the Sports Journalists’ Association – seems likely to sell out, so don’t wait too long if you plan to book.

This concludes my final ‘editorial’ before September, as my leave of absence is about to start. From next week onwards, some of my committee colleagues will take turns to write this piece. I won’t say goodbye, though, because I’ll still frequently be at the David Lean, so I look forward to chatting to supporters there, as usual!

New Campaign website

Committee members Roger Dowling and Alan Peakall have recently been working hard on preparing a long-awaited new Campaign website:
www.davidleancinema.org.uk. You’ll find full programme information there, with links to booking, as well as other information that I won’t outline here, because we hope you’ll want to visit the site and see for yourself! It’s fully functional but we are open to comments and suggestions concerning possible changes or additional elements that might be included if technically feasible. You’re welcome to send us your thoughts via the site’s “Contact Us” form, or if you prefer to use email, please write to info@davidleancinema.org.uk, the address which will replace our gmail address.

Roger advises that the only known issue with the website is that the live Twitter feed (seen on the right of some pages) can sometimes display incorrectly and instead shows a Twitter web address. This is linked to browser configuration, so if you don’t see the correct Twitter feed, use of another browser will usually resolves the problem.

July preview

Philip Howard writes:
Our July program starts with Evolution, a fascinating sci-fi / horror / mystery filmed on the otherworldly terrain of Lanzarote. Strong audience demand (thank you, as always!) for Florence Foster Jenkins mean that we’re providing two extra screenings – one in the afternoon, and another for our Babes in Arms audience. Some popular actors are on their summer travels – Tom Hanks to Saudi Arabia in A Hologram for the King, Juliet Stephenson to rural France for Departure, and Ewan McGregor and Naomie Harris to Marrakech for the John Le Carré adaptation Our Kind of Traitor. For our own summer holiday season – although with considerable appeal to adult audiences too – When Marnie Was There is a gently moving animation that may be the final ever release from the beloved Studio Ghibli. Travelling back in time, Jane Austen’s early novella Lady Susan is the basis for the acclaimed and hilarious Love and Friendship, while a more recent period comedy is the joyous 1980s musical Sing Street. This month’s program also celebrates two contemporary mavericks: a world champion cyclist and inventor is the subject of our annual Tour de France rest-day screening, Battle Mountain: Graeme Obree’s Story, while director Terrence Malick edits together mighty performances from an A-list cast (Bale, Blanchett, Portman) and breathtaking shots of the California landscape to form the fragmented yet beautiful dream that is Knight of Cups.

Tickets for all screenings go on sale at 9am on Thursday 9 June. July dates and times can be seen here.

Death of a Gentleman: important information

This screening, on Tuesday 7 June, coincides with the return of top-class Pearl Izumi Tour Series cycling to Croydon; the only London venue during a British tour. The Clocktower is within the circuit and although access should not be significantly impeded, we have decided to slightly delay the screening until 7.45pm, to ensure that patrons don’t have any difficulty arriving in time. This will also mean that anyone who would like to see the women’s Matrix Fitness Grand Prix race, starting at 6.30pm, will have time to do so. Race time and route details can be seen here.

Croydon Comedy Festival

Following a successful launch last year, this year’s festival will take place in June and July, and will feature around 50 events at 12 different venues. In addition to stand up comedy, there will be theatre and films, and we’re delighted to be festival participants, screening The Brand New Testament and Florence Foster Jenkins. Please see the Festival website for the full programme.


News Update 29 May 2016
The following is our July programme:

Tuesday 5 July 7.30pm: Evolution
Thursday 7 July 11.00am: Florence Foster Jenkins – Babes in Arms screening
Thursday 7 July 2.30pm & 7.30pm: A Hologram for the King
Tuesday 12 July 2.30pm: Florence Foster Jenkins
Tuesday 12 July 7.30pm: Departure
Thursday 14 July: 2.30pm* & 7.30pm: Our Kind of Traitor (*Hard of Hearing screening)
Tuesday 19 July 7.30pm: Battle Mountain: Graeme Obree’s Story
Thursday 21 July 11am & 7.30pm: Love & Friendship
Tuesday 26 July 2.30pm (and also Tuesday 2 August 7.30pm): When Marnie Was There
Tuesday 26 July 7.30pm: Knight of Cups
Thursday 28 July 2.30pm & 7.30pm: Sing Street


News Update 23 May 2016

I Am Belfast
I Am Belfast

Dear Supporter,
 
Disorder last Tuesday didn’t attract quite as many patrons as we might have expected, considering that our European thrillers have been known to sell out, but it was an enigmatic film appreciated by our patrons, who came up with some interesting theories to explain ambiguous elements! Thursday’s Our Little Sister was clearly a hit, with “absolutely charming” being highly representative of the feedback received.

I can’t claim to be a silent film enthusiast, but tomorrow’s film Shooting Stars sounds so intriguing and inviting that I couldn’t resist booking, so I hope to see you there! See below if you need any further incentive to see this milestone in British cinema. The impressionistic portrait I Am Belfast on Thursday promises to be equally absorbing, and a rare occasion when we can say that you’ll experience a film unlike any we have shown so far. Please note that I Am Belfast contains a sequence of flashing lights which might affect anyone susceptible to photosensitive epilepsy.

Next Tuesday offers an opportunity to see the internationally acclaimed Hungarian feature Son of Saul. Winner of 45 awards, including the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film, it tells a deeply unsettling story, but with such power and insight that most will find the emotional investment worthwhile. The Sydney Morning Herald called it “one of the greatest films ever made”. Note there are screenings at both 2.30 and 7.30pm

We anticipate that tickets will be available from our Clocktower box office before all three of the above films.

Finally, this is my penultimate update ‘editorial’ before September. Campaign Secretary John Ingman explains why in his contribution below. 

Adrian Winchester
Campaign Chairman

Adrian Winchester – leave of absence

John Ingman writes:
Adrian Winchester, Chair of the Campaign and its Director, has decided to take three months’ leave of absence from 1 June. Adrian has been working with the Campaign for five years without any significant break. He feels that the time has now come to take some time off from his duties, particularly in view of an urgent need to undertake some house renovation! During this period, his Campaign work will for the most part be done by other members of the Committee, although Adrian will still do some very limited, specialised work for the Campaign.

Adrian has made a unique contribution to the development of the Campaign and all those who support it will want to wish him some rest and refreshment during this break. We hope that he will return from it with renewed energies.